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Ear Phones for MP3 Players - Bench Tested: Shure E2c, Shure E2g, Shure E3c, Ultimate Ears Super.fi 3 Studio

Part II

June, 2007

John E. Johnson, Jr.

 

Shure E2g

 

Specifications:

 

● Transducer Type: Dynamic

● Sensitivity: 105 dB/mW

● Impedance: 16 Ohms

● Weight: 30 Grams

● MSRP: $99 USA

 

    Shure

Introduction

Back in March of this year, we reviewed a number of ear phones that could be used with MP3 players. The results were surprising in that the most expensive did not necessarily test out the best.

We continue our series of ear phone tests here, with the Shure E2c, E2g, E3c, and Ultimate Ears Super.fi 3 Studio.

Second on the list is the E2g (the E2c review is in Part I of this review set), which has an MSRP of $99. Shure states that the E2g phones are optimized for gaming, compared to the model E2c.

These ear phones have dynamic drivers and an impedance of 16 ohms.

The Sound

The E2gs were a bit nasal like the E2cs, and still had a flat frequency response, but with more emphasis in the bass than in the midrange. Like the E2cs, the E2gs have very low distortion, so to get a good sound is a matter of EQ (distortion, unlike the frequency response, cannot be remedied).

They fit similar to the E2cs, with a curved insertion and so, tended to slip out of my ears.

On the Bench

Notice that the frequency response is higher in the bass than in the midrange, whereas with the E2Cs, the reverse was the case.

Like the E2cs, the E2gs have very low IMD. This is extremely important, as high IMD would produce a mushiness to the sound, rather than being articulate.

Less than 2% THD+N occurred with a 20 Hz sine wave. This means good, deep bass.

At 1 kHz, there was only 0.3% THD+N.

At 10 kHz, less than 0.6% THD+N.

Conclusions

As with the E2cs, I gave the E2gs a rating of 6 for Fit and 8 for sound. Perhaps a bit more bass than the E2cs. The phones have very low distortion, so this results in a detailed sound, but it sure would be nice to get rid of the peaks above 2 kHz and raise the valley at 8 kHz.

Go to Part III.

Copyright 2007 Secrets of Home Theater & High Fidelity

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