Ask Secrets – Home Theater Hifi Q&A

This is the New Questions comment thread. Jump to the comment discussion below and Ask your question for the Secrets Editors

secrets-qa-ask

Our Editors will select questions to be featured in the VIEW FEATURED ANSWER ARTICLES section above. Everyone is welcome to Ask or Answer a specific question in this main Ask Secrets Q&A thread below.


  • A few nice questions…

    If room corrections for Acoustics is important to music and home cinema, where does it sit say in relation to other improvement options such as better power supplies or speaker cables? Which improvement makes the biggest difference and should be first on the list for upgrading?

    If balanced headphone configuration offers the best audio results why don’t manufacturers offer these instead we must rely on after market supply.

    In measuring room Acoustics is it necessary to measure only at the listening positions or multiple points in the room?

    Is it true that carpet and rugs vibrate and transmit esp. high frequency and should be avoided in home music and cinema settings. Have you ever seen a carpeted recording studio?

    Can you tell us more about the new format MQA, actual music or sampler records and player requirements.

    I hope these are of interest. There are loads more I can think of…it’s a start.

  • John E. Johnson, Jr.

    (1) Room acoustics will make more difference than cables.
    (2) I have not heard any difference between balanced and unbalanced headphone amplifiers, switching between balanced and unbalanced in the same amplifier.
    (3) I measure for room acoustics at the prime listening position. Otherwise, you end up with EQ that is not optimal anywhere in the room.
    (4) Carpets absorb a lot of the high frequency content, but not much of the low frequency content. My test lab is carpeted and also has extensive wall and ceiling treatment.
    (5) Your player will have to include MQA (Master Quality Assured) as one of the codecs it will decode.

  • John Johnson

    (1) Room acoustics will make more difference than cables.

    (2) I have not heard any difference between balanced and unbalanced
    headphone amplifiers, switching between balanced and unbalanced in the
    same amplifier.

    (3) I measure for room acoustics at the prime listening position.
    Otherwise, you end up with EQ that is not optimal anywhere in the room.

    (4) Carpets absorb a lot of the high frequency content, but not much of
    the low frequency content. My test lab is carpeted and also has
    extensive wall and ceiling treatment.

    (5) Your player will have to include MQA (Master Quality Assured) as one of the codecs it will decode.

  • John
    Thanks for your replies here.
    I will reply in more depth later on after Eid holidays.
    John Read

  • Allan Graves

    Help! I’m getting a bit lost in surround formats. We currently are putting in a larger home theater – the room is 15′ wide x 20′ long. There will be 2 or 3 rows of seating in the theater. I’d like to use dolby atmos – however, after viewing the 7.2.4 configuration, it appears as if it is mainly used for a single couch.
    1) Most receivers seem to only support the x.x.4 configuration. Should I slide the overhead speakers back so that they are centered over the theater, and not the couches? My ceiling is not very high – about 8′, so there’s not a lot of diffusion.

    2) The 7 part of the equation seems lacking in equality for all seating positions. Looking at the dolby site, there are dozens of additional options for speakers, but it seems like I would just want to replicate the LeftRight Surround to even out the response. Do receivers support this? I see that I can do additional “wide” surround channels, but this doesn’t seem like what I’m looking for (or think I should be looking for…).

    Any thoughts on moving to longer theater rooms with more seating options? Thanks!!

  • John Johnson

    Personally, I would center the ceiling speakers over the rows of couches. As to your second question, automated room correction (EQ, Distance, etc.), some form of which is in most new receivers, can be adjusted for one sitting position, or for several (such as several couches), but in the latter case, it is a compromise. I would decide that based on how often it was more than just my wife and myself watching the movie. If I had guests more than 20% of the time, I would run the room correction with the microphone in the center of each of the couches. If your concern is really just the front left/right, you could purchase two in-wall speakers and place them about four feet in front of the left/right speakers in the wall, facing into the room. Wire them in parallel with your main speakers, but use only 8 ohm speakers for both the front left/right and the additional speakers, and make sure your receiver can handel 4 ohm loads. This would give you a spacious soundstage for the main channels.

  • Thanks very helpful strategic Q&A here.

  • Little Yancey

    Hi
    Before I realized that this forum existed I shipped this question directly to Dr. Johnson, so please accept apologies for inadvertent dual-tracking. (No answer yet on the other track.)
    Here’s the question: I’ve got a Marantz 7702 pre/pro. I’m happy with it. I also have an Oppo 103. I’m happy with it, too. But I have a feeling that both are processing the video signal, which is something I probably should not be happy with. If that’s the case, which component should do the processing? And how do I block the other component from processing? The Marantz manual is unhelpful on this score and the Oppo techs say to deal with Marantz… So I’m hoping you all can give me a hand with this issue. Many thanks, Steven Simon

  • Allan Graves

    My brother is really getting into the older dvd-a and sacd surround formats for audio releases. There doesn’t appear to be many newer audio releases coming out in surround, even on bluray. Is the surround music release going the way of the dodo? Do you think there will be a resurgence in this area with downloads? Maybe MQA?

  • ariel

    To THX or no THX in this modern time? Is it good to use THX processing for example with TrueHD, DTS HD MASTER, Atmos or is THX processing a thing of the past that while some modern receivers still carry it with todays codecs is it best to leave it OFF?

  • Robert

    While it used to be a very popular
    feature, I am not seeing THX processing included on many of the receivers and
    processors these days. Onkyo still
    includes THX processing on their Atmos receivers, but the processing cannot be
    applied to Dolby TrueHD or to Atmos. THX
    can be combined with DTS Neo:X for both Music and Cinema when using stereo, 5.1
    channel and 7.1 channel sources. If you have a receiver or processor that
    supports THX, give the processing options a try and see what you like best.

  • ariel

    Yes thank you. I have the Onkyo 805. I tried THX and to my ears the highs seem to roll off. It’s not as bright and that part is good.

  • Trevor Jordan

    Is something broke or just hooked up wrong?

    I just moved recently and have hooked my stereo back up a little differently than it was in my last place. Now I am using a CambridgeAudio 640R AVR* and a McIntosh MC2120 2 channel power amp with a pair of *Bi-ampable* Polk Audio RTi10 tower speakers. The speakers consist of a tweeter, a 6 1/2 woofer/mid range and two 7 inch subwoofers. I also utilize an EQ. Before this set up it was exactly same just no Cambridge and wired differently of course, instead I was utilizing my 76′ SX-950. Now I have all kinds of vocals coming through my subs. They are literally trying to run as full range speakers. Right now I have it set up the only way my wires at the moment will allow which is in this order 1)PS4 2)TV 3)EQ 4)Y adapter rca cables out to 5)>Cambridge>tweeter/full range 5)>McIntosh>subwoofers. I know that the EQ will force a change in the subs output especially with the EQ being the last thing the McIntosh saw but it didn’t sound like this when I had the old SilverFace hooked up.

  • Jim Milton

    Trevor,
    If nothing has changed except the additional Cambridge AVR, I would start there. Is there a crossover setting in the AVR menu? If so, set it 80Hz as a good starting point. If the AVR doesn’t have a crossover, see if your subwoofer has one and set IT to 80Hz. A low pass filter lets the low (bass) signal pass on to the sub. It sounds likely that this is the problem and why the sub is trying to reproduce a full range signal. Good luck and let us know how you make out. 😉