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Home Theater Movie Renter's Guide - April, 2014

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"Bagman" (Blu-ray) - Reviewed by Jim Milton

movies-apr-2014-Bagman

Synopsis

John Cusack and Robert De Niro star in this action-packed crime thriller about a hit-man named Jack (Cusack), who takes an assignment to deliver a mysterious bag to his crafty boss (De Niro) with strict instructions not to peek inside. With the help of an elusive prostitute (Da Costa), Jack battles a mess-load of gunfire, a slew of crooked cops and unruly mobsters on a deadly quest to deliver the precious cargo and earn a big pay day. By the end of the night, he begins to think this assignment just might not be worth the money.

Specifications

  • Universal Studios
  • 2014, Color, Rated R, 1 hour 39 minutes
  • Aspect Ratio 2.40:1
  • 1080P
  • 5.1 DTS-MA
  • Starring: John Cusack, Rebecca Da Costa, Robert De Niro, Crispin Glover, Dominic Purcell
  • Directed by: David Grovic
Rating
  • Entertainment:
  • Video:
  • Audio:
  • Extras:
  • Violence: Yes
  • Sex: Themes w/o nudity
  • Language: Yes

Commentary

I love DeNiro and Cusack as actors, so I had high hopes for this movie. Unfortunately, the movie played out like a bad David Fincher movie ala Twin Peaks. It contains a bevy of weird characters (a one-eyed pimp and a midget. And Glover was delightfully troubling) that harass Cusack all through the night at a seedy hotel outside of the Big Easy. The bag is, of course, a McGuffin. When the contents are revealed, all I could think of was the movie Seven...another Fincher plot device. Ultimately, the movie slides downward due to the poor acting of Da Costa who vainly attempts a Russian accent and later is revealed to be some sort of super hitman, err...person. It was supposed to be the big "OMG" twist at the end, but I was having none of it. If Fincher-type movies are your thing, rent this. For the rest of you, bag it.

Technical

In spite of many dark sets, most of which are overly lit out door scenes, the details, contrasts and colors are very good. Colored lights of vibrant reds and blues are used to set up the mood of the film early on. Dialog is clear and crisp. The surrounds help set up the tense mood and the sub jumps in near the end with an explosive finale at the hotel. This is another case of good disc, bad movie.

Extras

Behind the scenes and a Digital Copy are included.